Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

African American History: Streaming Videos

Librarian Live Chat

chat loading...

You can now text us from your phone for assistance!

Text (857) 877 - 2255 to chat with a librarian

Your carrier's text rates may apply.

RCC Library

1234 Columbus Avenue
Building 3, Room 211
Boston, MA 02120
Phone: 857-701-1380
Email: library1@rcc.mass.edu

Search the Web

Google Web Search

Streaming Videos

Full length and segment videos from AVON and Kanopy.

AVON, Academic Video Online, has over 60,000 titles covering a wide range of academic subjects. Kanopy streams thousands of films including classic cinema, documentaries, independent movies, and foreign films.

The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross

The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross

Written and presented by Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., director of W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University, this six-hour series explores the evolution of the African-American people, as well as the multiplicity of cultural institutions, political strategies, and religious and social perspectives they developed -- forging their own history, culture and society against unimaginable odds.

Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise

Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise

This series looks at the last five decades of African American history through the eyes of Henry Louis Gates, Jr., exploring the tremendous gains and persistent challenges of these years. Drawing on eyewitness accounts, scholarly analysis and rare archival footage, the series illuminates our recent past, while raising urgent questions about the future of the African American community--and our nation as a whole.

Color Adjustment

Color Adjustment

In this documentary, Marlon Riggs - Emmy winning producer of ETHNIC NOTIONS - carries his landmark studies of prejudice into the Television Age. COLOR ADJUSTMENT traces 40 years of race relations through the lens of prime time entertainment, scrutinizing television's racial myths and stereotypes.

The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords

The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords

THE BLACK PRESS: SOLDIERS WITHOUT SWORDS is the first film to chronicle the history of the Black press, including its central role in the construction of modern African American identity. It recounts the largely forgotten stories of generations of Black journalists who risked life and livelihood so African Americans could represent themselves in their own words and images.

THE BLACK PRESS takes viewers "behind the veil" of segregation to recover a distinctly Black perspective on key events from antebellum America to the Civil Rights Movement. It offers an intimate social history of African American life during these turbulent years - the achievements trumpeted, defeats pondered, celebrities admired, even the products advertised.

Massachusetts Black History

Massachusetts Black History (1974)

Program consists of a tour of prominent landmarks related to African American history in Boston, Massachusetts. Guest Byron Rushing, Director of the Museum of Afro-American History, Boston, takes host Topper Carew to specific historical sites to retrace the steps of African Americans in Boston during the early 1800s... Program includes an interview with Melnea Cass, one of Boston's oldest black activists, and Byron Rushing, in which the history of Roxbury is discussed.

Black Feminist

Black Feminist

Black Feminist is a feature length documentary film surrounding the double edged sword of racial and gender oppression that black women face in America. This documentary is told through interviews from scholars, lecturers, writers, business owners, veterans, comedians and authors. In addition to information interviews, this documentary is narrated by our storybook character LaToya Johnson, played by Nadirah Lugg.

The Long Shadow

The Long Shadow

When two daughters of the South, Director Frances Causey and Producer Sally Holst, set out to find causes for the continuing racial divisions in the United States, they discovered that the politics of slavery didn't end after the Civil War.

In an astonishingly candid look at the history of anti-black racism in the United States, THE LONG SHADOW traces the blunt imposition of white privilege and its ultimate manifestation-slavery. Causey and Holst conclude that, without a doubt, artifacts of slavery remain at work in American society today.

The Uncomfortable Truth

The Uncomfrotable Truth

When the son of a Civil Rights Hero dives into the 400 year history of racism in America, he is confronted with the shocking reality that his family was involved from the very beginning. A comprehensive and insightful exploration of the origins and history of racism in America -- from slavery to Jim Crow era, from lynchings to protests -- told through a very personal and honest story.

Winner of Best Documentary at the Utah Film Awards, National Black Film Festival, and the Park City International Film Festival.

Subject Guide

William Hoag's picture
William Hoag
Contact:
Roxbury Community College Library
Room 211 Academic Building
1234 Columbus Ave.
Boston, MA 02120-3400
Phone: 857-701-1386
Website

Library Hours

Library Hours

On Campus Hours

By reservation only!

Monday: 8:30 - 5:00 pm

Tuesday: 8:30 - 5:00 pm

Wednesday: 8:30 - 5:00 pm

Thursday: 8:30 - 5:00 pm

Friday: 8:30 - 5:00 pm

Saturday: CLOSED

Sunday: CLOSED

Virtual Hours

Monday: 8:30 - 8:00 pm
Tuesday: 8:30 - 8:00 pm
Wednesday: 8:30 - 8:00 pm
Thursday: 8:30 - 8:00 pm
Friday: 8:30 - 5:00 pm
Saturday: 8:30 - 3:00 pm

You can find the services we offer at a distance via Zoom, Teams, and other internet-based methods on our remote services page.

 

Evening class instruction available by request. To see if the RCC Library is closed on school holidays and semester breaks, please consult the Library Calendar.

Contact Us

857-701-1380

or via text at 857-877-2255

library1@rcc.mass.edu

1234 Columbus Avenue
Building 3, Room 211
Boston, MA 02120